01
May

Kama – Dance of Desire

Review of The Banana and the Peepul Leaf; Asuri Vasudevan; CinnamonTeal Publishing 2015; Rs 400; pp 262

– Shana Susan Ninan

Asuri Vasudevan’s The Banana and the Peepul Leaf is full of turns – life poses several choices to us; sometimes flinging the most apt one at our faces. Relationships and the strings attached to them form the crux of Vasudevan’s sequel to Cloudburst.

Kama is an interesting concept. It is intriguing, deep and desirous. You can even call it the protagonist of the story, the central force upon which the story revolves. How do people of different races fall in love? How do they stay in love? For Radha, it is love at first sight when she sees Prakash and the fact that Prakash is a married man is dismissed as a minor detail. Prakash is attracted to Radha’s sensuality even though he is very much in love with his wife.

As youngsters trying to make a place for themselves in the world, Phillip and Gomi have to make a sense of their yearnings for each other. Prakash’s wife Kathy sensing her husband’s betrayal uses the same approach partly to pacify herself and partly to radically transform the life of someone she cares for. For Kathy’s friend and soul sister Maya, sex is the culmination of companionship.

Based in Mumbai, Vasudevan is an economist, with specialisations in central banking and international finance. He has worked in various countries on long stints, and have been advisor in several international organisations. The story is spread across Asia, Africa and America.

In the book, what I cherished the most is the ending – it isn’t usual, and there’s a punch to it. The book cover is simple and lucid, a pointer to the lives unravelled inside. It’s a great book for a weekend read, full of surprises and interesting quips and quotes.

VN:F [1.9.20_1166]
Rating: 8.2/10 (13 votes cast)
Kama – Dance of Desire, 8.2 out of 10 based on 13 ratings

enjoyed this post? share with others:

twitter stumble upon digg

This entry was posted on Sunday, May 1st, 2016 at 1:52 am and is filed under Fiction, Reviews. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

leave a comment