20
Oct

Her Mother’s Champion

Review of Hiding Places:A Mother, A daughter, an uncovered life; Diane Wyshogrod; Excelsior Editions 2012; pp 298

– Shana Susan Ninan

All of us have memories, people and feelings we’ve hidden away in the dark and deep recesses of our minds. The kind that we don’t allow to surface, to occupy spaces in our daily lives. But sometimes, just sometimes, we allow our loved ones to gain access to them, and at other times, we open to them, on self-will or by persuasion.

Dina’s Hiding Places is one such attempt, I’d say – she is her mother’s champion in unraveling a part of her mother’s youthful days, peeling off layers of years. As painful as it is, Dina gets her mother to speak about her years during the Nazi Occupation of Poland, specifically the 16 long months she’d spent in a 4ft by 6ft cellar. Although her mother at first disagrees with sharing her disturbing past with the world, Dina successfully convinces her mother to do so. But, as the author goes deeper into the processing of taking down the notes directly from her mother, both are overwhelmed at times, by the sheer expanse of what her mother went through.

In the middle of the book is a beautiful session on how Dina’s mother, Lutka and others who’ve suffered under the Nazi regime “revisit” Zolkiew, their hometown. The narration covers several pages, and Is skillfully crafted to reflect the emotions that the group experiences as they travel through a city that was once theirs.

Now, riding through the night, I feel myself trying to absorb Israel into my skin, through all my senses…. I feel my identity – even my age – shifting. I am Lutka’s daughter, the granddaughter of Josef Rosenberg, the town pharmacist. I suddenly feel like a precocious youngster being taken on an adult outing. I almost forgot that I am already in the middle of my own life, a professional, a wife, a mother with school-age children.

A psychologist’s perspective and scientific background comes through, in some parts of the book, though not over powering that the smooth flow of a non-fiction novel is affected by it. Dina’s words are poignant, with deep meanings and attributes. Very few people who have lived through trauma can write about it with this kind of detachment, at the same time not leaving out the intensity of the situations. Readers will feel like they are in the midst of a dinner time conversation, or stuck in the tiny cellar, or travelling in the bus with Dina, her mother and others… they are so many more examples to elucidate that. The vivid and varied photographs only enhance the read.

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Rating: 9.3/10 (9 votes cast)
Her Mother’s Champion, 9.3 out of 10 based on 9 ratings

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This entry was posted on Monday, October 20th, 2014 at 10:18 pm and is filed under Non-Fiction, Reviews, War. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

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